Abstract Samples

 

1Personal Trainers and Characteristics Associated with Body Image Distortion

 

2Deborah Rhea, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX.

3The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to explore the extent to which females in the sample reported behavioral and psychological characteristics related to Body Image Distortion (BID) and 2) to determine if personal trainers were more prone to BID than a female control group (non-personal trainers). 4Female personal trainers (n = 57, age 22-50 yrs) from 46 fitness gyms and the female control group (n=43, age 22-50 yrs) from schools in the same area completed the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ).  5A MANOVA showed that differences existed between the two groups on the MBSRQ subscales.  The main effect differences were for the subscales appearance orientation, F(1, 89)=5.44, p=.02 and overweight preoccupation, F(1,98) = 4.72, p=.03.  No significant differences were found for appearance evaluation (p>.05), body areas satisfaction (p>.05), and self-classified weight (p>.05). These main effect differences showed that personal trainers placed more importance on how they looked and reported more fat anxiety, weight vigilance, dieting, and eating restraints than the female control group. 6Although a limited sample was used, the findings suggest that personal trainers should be examined more closely for BID issues and the impact of these issues on others.

*** The numbers included above correspond with the information below. This is only provided for your understanding of what needs to be included in an abstract. DO NOT include the numbers in your submitted abstract.

1 = Title of presentation submission

2 = Name and affiliation of the author(s)

3 = First sentence – purpose

4 = Next 1-2 sentences – method

5 = Next few sentences – results

6 = Last sentence – conclusion

1Spiritual Meaning Making in the Lives of Older Adults

2Harriet L. Cohen, PhD, LCSW, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX

3The purpose of this research was to examine how older adults make meaning of the spiritual turning points in their lives. 4Twenty-four African American and Jewish older adults were recruited from a synagogue and a neighborhood center serving older African Americans and interviewed in separate ethnic groups. Participants were asked to complete a form and participate in a focus group identifying their spiritual turning points and the impact of those events on their lives at the time they occurred and now. Focus groups methodology was selected because of their low cost, high validity, and successful results with cultural groups. 5Findings reveal that spiritual meaning making for older adults involves four dimensions: personal, interpersonal, sociocultural and structural. Meaning making for these older adults may involve attributing an old meaning to a new situation or reinterpreting an old experience from a new understanding. This narrative gerontology approach provided a framework for these ethnically, culturally, and religiously diverse older adults to explore how these critical, spiritual events contributed to life’s meaning. 6Their stories illustrate how older adults learn and grow from the events in their lives and how they utilize spiritual meaning making to increase their adaptive capacity. (195 words)


*** The numbers included above correspond with the information below. This is only provided for your understanding of what needs to be included in an abstract. DO NOT include the numbers in your submitted abstract. Abstract should be 200 words or less.

1 = Title of presentation submission

2 = Name and affiliation of the author(s)

3 = First sentence – purpose

4 = Next 1-2 sentences – method

5 = Next few sentences – results/findings

6 = Last sentence – conclusion

 

 

 

 

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